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Big Changes to NZ Coming: A 'Renewable' Future for Kiwis

The winds of change are blowing strong in Aotearoa as the Government zeroes in on its commitment to a green energy future. A whopping three wind farm projects, poised to produce as much electricity as the Clyde Dam, are being ushered onto the fast track. But what does this mean for New Zealand and Kiwis at large? Let’s unpack the details.





The Three Game-Changers

These proposed wind farms are located strategically across our beautiful nation: in Manawatu, close to Auckland, and down south in Southland. While they're yet to get the official nod of approval, their fast-tracking is a clear signal of the Government's intentions.


Why the Fast Track?

The fast-tracking mechanism traces its roots back to the COVID-19 recovery legislation. Introduced as a temporary measure, it's all set to become a mainstay through the upcoming Natural and Built Environments Bill. Slated to become law shortly, this bill is the successor to the Government's Resource Management Act (RMA).

The expedited process is quite the time-saver, slashing consenting time by an average of 18 months per project.




Emission Cuts and Jobs for Kiwis

If given the green light, these wind farms are projected to diminish carbon emissions by a staggering 150 million kilograms. That's equivalent to the emissions from generating the same power using fossil fuels! But that's not all. These projects also promise to create a boost in employment, offering up to 840 construction jobs.

To put things into perspective, Energy and Resources Minister Megan Woods drew a comparison with the Clyde Dam, New Zealand's third-largest hydroelectric dam. The three wind farms would nearly match the dam's output, with a combined potential peak output of 419 Mw.

A Deeper Dive into the Biggest Player

Taking centre stage among these projects is Contact Energy's proposal for Southland. This colossal endeavour will potentially house 55 wind turbines, producing up to 300 Mw at their peak. This means jobs for 240 Kiwis during construction and 14 permanent roles post-completion.




Solar Panels Joining the Mix

Wind farms aren't the only green energy sources on the horizon. Nine substantial solar panel projects, totalling about 1.9 million panels, have also been proposed for fast-track approval since 2020. Their combined output? A mind-blowing two and a half times that of the Clyde Dam!

These solar endeavours, alongside other renewable projects, could culminate in an impressive 3500 construction jobs across New Zealand and over 350 permanent positions.

The Vision for 2050

The Kiwi Government has set its sights high. By 2035, the goal is to have 50% of our energy needs fulfilled by renewables. Fast forward to 2050, and the aspiration is an even bolder 100% renewable energy generation.


The emphasis on wind and solar projects epitomises New Zealand's commitment to a sustainable future. For the everyday Kiwi, this means not only a cleaner environment but also fresh job opportunities. It's a future we can all look forward to, embracing our nation's abundant natural resources. Ka pai tō mahi, New Zealand!



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Reference article: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2023/08/government-fast-tracks-three-wind-farms-for-approval.html

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